Manual Phantastes: A Faerie Romance for Men and Women with Readers Guide

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Phantastes: A Faerie Romance for Men and Women with Readers Guide file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Phantastes: A Faerie Romance for Men and Women with Readers Guide book. Happy reading Phantastes: A Faerie Romance for Men and Women with Readers Guide Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Phantastes: A Faerie Romance for Men and Women with Readers Guide at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Phantastes: A Faerie Romance for Men and Women with Readers Guide Pocket Guide.
Product Description
Contents:
  1. Phantastes: A Faerie Romance for Men and Women - eBook
  2. See a Problem?
  3. Phantastes - Wikipedia
  4. Phantastes

This is not a positive step into a fantasy world, but a way in which the author of the work controls those who are enveloped within the tale. While using the same concepts as MacDonald, Lewis provides a sinister and dark side to these tales which affect or transform us, although he also leaves much of his fantasy work open to the same critique enacted by the Un-Man. While reading the Twilight of the Gods as a child, Lewis describes becoming totally engulfed in the tale and feeling dissatisfied with reality once the tale had been finished Anodos, too, manages to step back into the real world, although as is shown through his first attempt to describe one of the fairy tales, his transformation by the texts may not be all it seems.

What Lewis demonstrates is the difficult nature of transformative reading, as Donald T. Williams succinctly summarises in Mere Humanity: Literature can expand the horizons of and deepen our capacity for experience, it can open our eyes to Christian truths which might otherwise have escaped us. Lewis, while being aware of the ability to corrupt a reader through transformation, still attempts to create a transformative literary vehicle in his Space Trilogy. For Lewis there is a careful balance to be found as a writer because he could easily become the Un-Man, telling stories which only reflect oneself as the hero.

The temptation to write tales without an evangelistic purpose is, for Lewis, tantamount to falling into the other side of the literary mirror. There is therefore an uncomfortable note when we are told that the Un-Man has already written the play for The Lady to act out. Perelandra can be seen as a Garden of Eden in which Ransom battles against the Un-Man to avert a fall within that world. That Hideous Strength, set on our own world, centres upon the conversion of the heroes, Mark and Jane, to Christianity.

Thus Lewis provides all of these works with a clear religious message for his readers; by reading the entire trilogy the reader is moved through various imaginative states. By setting the first two books on Mars and Venus, Lewis presents concepts which would be rejected if they were presented within a more normal environment; these worlds are recognisable only through the eyes of Ransom, an unremarkable hero. The awakened imagination plays a significant role in both Phantastes and Perelandra. Through an examination of the implications and responsibilities which C.

Lewis found within the concept of an awakened imagination, this paper reveals that Lewis was aware of the paradoxical status which he held, opening and influencing the imagination through his writing. Lewis develops the idea more fully in Perelandra than MacDonald does in Phantastes, allowing us to see and exist on both sides of the mirror, both having our imaginations awakened while reading of the negative consequences of a malicious awakener, in Perelandra.

Endnotes 1.

Given that at the period when Lewis first encountered Phantastes he was an atheist and continued as such for a period of years following this moment, I am inclined towards the former understanding of this baptism of the imagination. Works Cited Clute, J. Nicholls and J. London: Orbit, Lewis, C. George MacDonald: Readings. New York: Collier, Perelandra, London: Bodley Head, MacDonald, George.

Phantastes: Special Annotated Edition, ed. Nick Page, London: Paternoster Press, Prickett, Stephen. Reis, R. Williams, D. I recently decided to read it again because of the impact it had on Lewis. Having done so, I can only conclude that Lewis saw a great deal more in it than I was able to, although I did enjoy it -- particularly the last third. There are some great moments. But it struck me as kind of a fairy land hodge podge, only with the hodge parts and the podge parts packed closely tog I know that I read this once before, many moons ago.

But it struck me as kind of a fairy land hodge podge, only with the hodge parts and the podge parts packed closely together by hand. View 2 comments. In many ways this really isn't a good book. The style borders on choppy and dense. The story doesn't always flow. MacDonald routinely makes excurses without telling you. The "mythopoeic" prose is its redeeming quality. MaDonald bathed the book in sacramentality. Every leaf, grove, and spring refleted redemption--and MacDonald is a talented enough artist that he can show redemption without telling you redemption usually.

The story line is simple enough. The protagonists finds himself in " In many ways this really isn't a good book. The protagonists finds himself in "faerie land" and must navigate through trials and temptations, with all the self-discoveries. CS Lewis mentioned this book spoke of a "good death.

This is none other than the Christian story of Baptism, a Baptism that our hero must undergo. Final thoughts: Sometimes the beauty was so intoxicating that I felt my heart would stop. May 07, Werner rated it liked it Recommends it for: Fantasy fans who don't mind Victorian diction. Shelves: fantasy. While I read this book several years ago the date is a "best guess" , I'd actually started it back in and didn't finish it at that time. It gets off to kind of a slow start, and one element in the storyline was initially off-putting to me but no spoilers here!

However, I'm glad I decided to give it a second and fairer chance; it proved to be a solid three-star fantasy that I enjoyed. Basically, it's a coming-of-age tale in a fantasy setting; and it's perhaps the first example in th While I read this book several years ago the date is a "best guess" , I'd actually started it back in and didn't finish it at that time. Knowing that MacDonald was a favorite author of C. Lewis, it isn't hard to see the influence of this work on the idea behind the latter's Narnia series. There are actually no explicit Christian references in the book, but the author's Christian worldview underlies the strongly moral tone and messages here.

Of course, this is a 19th-century work, with Victorian diction throughout; readers who find that problematic will probably enjoy the book less than those of us who don't mind that! A friend and I decided to have "family story time" each evening as a new bedtime routine to help us fall asleep more calmly in the midst of interpersonal and academic stress. We chose this classic tale, picked up by C. Lewis at a train station he later said that it influenced his writing greatly..

We have at least a dozen notecards with quotes from the book scattered about the A friend and I decided to have "family story time" each evening as a new bedtime routine to help us fall asleep more calmly in the midst of interpersonal and academic stress. We have at least a dozen notecards with quotes from the book scattered about the room now. View 1 comment. The book relates the story of Anodos, a young wealthy man who, on his 21st birthday receives the keys to a mysterious secretary which belonged to his father.

He opens it and so begins his journey into adulthood.

It is really the story of his coming of age through challenges he has to overcome, of joy and love and sadness and despair, for he must go through all of that. His journey takes him to a fantastic land — he meets a birch-tree that is not really a tree, statues that are not really statues, giants and knights and kind old ladies. Learn that sometimes we do harm and are forgiven by those whom we have hurt, that love can be of many ways, that beauty does not equal purity of soul, and friendship has wonderful rewards.

Each adventure is meant to teach him something and he comes out of this experience changed, an adult. Imbued with wonderful bits of poetry and very vividly described scenes, it took me to another world where everything was possible and nothing was left to chance, to a land where beauty goes hand in hand with ugliness and where weeping is the companion of laughter. In other words, life. Mar 19, Alex rated it really liked it Recommends it for: fantasy geeks. Shelves: reading-through-history , , rth-lifetime.

This is a neat little book. It's a bit episodic, and a little flowery, but it's really vivid; there's some terrific imagery in here. It's the story of some dude who goes to fairy land and wanders around mooning after some lady. There are giants and goblins. It's considered one of the first fantasy novels, and a big influence on CS Lewis and Tolkien. There a This is a neat little book. There are knights and monsters, what did you think fantasy was? It changed CS Lewis's life, judging from his fawning introduction, but it didn't change mine.

I don't even like fantasy. But it's pretty cool. Jan 21, Megan Fritts rated it it was amazing Shelves: favorites. Absolutely the most incredible book I've ever read. I'm pretty sure it will stay my favorite forever. That is what this book was, to me. I know that you're not supposed to "over-sell" books, because then everyone's expectations will be high, or whatever. I don't care. This book changed how I view the world. Lewis was spot-on in his opinion of MacDonald, Absolutely the most incredible book I've ever read.

Lewis was spot-on in his opinion of MacDonald, and especially of this book. By the time the book ended, I was transfixed in a sort of solemn reverence for life. And for death. Just read the book, ok? Jan 17, John rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction. Very good. Now if only I could understand more of the symbolism Oct 08, Heideblume rated it liked it Shelves: fantasy. Atmosfere ottocentesce, romantiche, evocative, oniriche.

Molte descrizioni e poca azione. Le idee ci sono Es. In compenso questo libro h Atmosfere ottocentesce, romantiche, evocative, oniriche. In compenso questo libro ha di buono l'aver segnato indelebilmente sia C. I learned that he that will be a hero, will barely be a man; that he that will be nothing but a doer of his work, is sure of his manhood. In nothing was my ideal lowered, or dimmed, or grown less precious; I only saw it too plainly, to set myself for a moment beside it. Indeed, my ideal soon became my life; whereas, formerly, my life had consisted in a vain attempt to behold, if not my ideal in myself, at least myself in my ideal.

Nov 03, Jeslyn rated it it was amazing. Lyrical, mesmerizing "faerie romance for men and women", thus far this story focuses on Anodos and his epic journey through the dreamlike Fairy Land - but if the reader is looking for tiny winged creatures, he will find them only briefly; Fairy Land is populated with numerous inhabitants who are in fact human, and others appear so but with supernatural qualities. Though society and rampant marketing have oversold the idea of a benign parallel world of beauty and frolicking sprites, make no mis Lyrical, mesmerizing "faerie romance for men and women", thus far this story focuses on Anodos and his epic journey through the dreamlike Fairy Land - but if the reader is looking for tiny winged creatures, he will find them only briefly; Fairy Land is populated with numerous inhabitants who are in fact human, and others appear so but with supernatural qualities.

Though society and rampant marketing have oversold the idea of a benign parallel world of beauty and frolicking sprites, make no mistake - the world McDonald has created is far more than pan flutes, babbling brooks and laughter, and much of the main character's adventure involves the grotesque and disturbing; Anodos definitely has his work cut out for him here.

A wonderful, wonderful, story, with some of the most beautiful imagery I've read, and a glorious finish. Regarding the back-cover reference to a "faerie romance" - this is without question a love story, but not in the blushing, eyelid-fluttering sense of the word. Boys and men would do well to read this book, and will have plenty to rivet their attention. Jul 30, Larissa rated it it was amazing Shelves: fantasy , secular-reading-for-christians , read Like many of the other reviewers, I am certain that a second reading would reveal much more of this story to me.

Phantastes: A Faerie Romance for Men and Women - eBook

Many times throughtout the reading I wished I could just jump into MacDonalds mind and find the key to much that I am sure is allegorical! This book is so beautiful it almost hurts. I loved and was confused by it. I know now why C. Lewis thought him a master; if Lewis loooked up to him you know that most of the rest of us would see him as brilliant!

The story begins with this young Like many of the other reviewers, I am certain that a second reading would reveal much more of this story to me. The story begins with this young man's 21st birthday and continues through a meeting with humans and others who inhabit the world of faerie land into which he awakens. He travels through forest and caves, sea and river eventually making a great sacrifice for the purpose of revealing truth to a beloved friend who had been decieved. The man eventually awakens from his visit and is reminded to use all he learned in faerie land to help him live his life in reality.

Not a difficult book to read, but definetly a book that bears much more study and thought than most! Recommend without reservations! Aug 09, Michaela rated it it was amazing. In other words, it was fun while it lasted, but not worth a second read or even a second thought. And we sit there a few minutes trying to piece it all together.

Phantastes by George MacDonald is the latter kind. In my opinion, Anodos is an extremely lucky person. He follows it into a strange land where many very odd things happen in seemingly no particular order, with even stranger people, some of whom are on their own journeys. I particularly love Sir Percival in his armor that will only shine again when the blows of enemy swords have chipped all the rust from it; and the strange house with the three doors - the door of grief, the door of sighs, and the door of dismay, from which the only door leading away is that of the vault of a tomb.

What we call evil, is the only and best shape, which for the person and his condition at the time, could be assumed by the best good. View all 5 comments. Jul 24, matthew rated it it was ok. This is an interesting book. Lewis further said that Phantastes "baptized [his:] imagination".

Those are strong words and citations from an author that I love reading. So I decided to try out Phantastes. It is a "fairy romance", but really it is in the vein of Bunyan's "Pilgrim's Progress"--an extended allegory about life and philosophy. Except, in this version, none of the characters are explicitly This is an interesting book. Except, in this version, none of the characters are explicitly named is an Pilgrim's Progress. It had a lot of beautiful language and some interesting ideas. However, parts of it I am not sure still what MacDonald was trying to say.

I wish I understood more of his imagery. I need to go back and read it again. The tale is of a man who wakes up one day in fairy land.

See a Problem?

There, he wanders aimlessly until he finds a woman of marble that he brings to life by his song. He spends the rest of the book seeking her and learning along the way. It is a tale of innocence lost, humility found. Jul 25, Chad Gibbons rated it really liked it. What an excellent book. This is my favorite George MacDonald book by far. There is a palpable sense of danger as the narrator Anodos tells of his travels in Fairy-Land.


  • Offer Them Life: A Life-Based Evangelistic Vision?
  • Phantastes.
  • Phantastes by George MacDonald.
  • Twelve Days of Christmas in North Staffordshire of a Bygone age.
  • !
  • Navigation menu.

Along his journey, he encounters sinister Ash trees, mischievous kobolds, women who only appear in the reflection of mirrors, Sir Galahad, and a host of other fairy-folk. It's written in the classic George MacDonald surrealist tone, which at times will make you gape with wonder and at others cringe in horror.

If you take any deli What an excellent book. If you take any delight in serious Fairy tales, then you must read this. It's the grandfather of them all. This is one of those books that I wanted to love. There are portions of it that I really enjoyed, and I like the overall tone of the book. It is high and poetic, but this is also where I get lost.

As I read it, I felt like there was a lot going over my head. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Phantastes , please sign up. Someone loaned me this book thinking it is something I could read to my children, ages 8 and They are sensitive to death and cruelty. I don't need details, just wondering if i should try reading it to them?

Thank you! Edward Ingram I agree with Joaquin Garza. You should read this book Phantastes for your self. It's wonderful. See 1 question about Phantastes…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Sep 26, Cindy Rollins rated it it was amazing Shelves: The first time I read this I was a newly married 18 yo. My husband was taking a class at college titled Oxford Christians and I may as well have taken the class myself because I read every single life-changing book Dr. Kay Ludwigson assigned.

And of all the books by all those wonderful Inklings and hangers-on, this book, Phantastes, captured my imagination and began my love of George MacDonald in a unique way. I loved this book. Ordo Amoris. They say the brain has definite patterns of nostalgia The first time I read this I was a newly married 18 yo. They say the brain has definite patterns of nostalgia so that they can predict your age by what you listen to on the radio.

I wonder if that is also true of returning to old book loves? I find myself, more and more, returning to those old loves to see if they are still the bright baubles of my youth. Phantastes still holds up. George MacDonald is still a good man who writes good books and those books still make me want to be good.

I am not the passionate 18 yo ready to fix all things wrong anymore. At 18 I was fascinated with the statuesque lady. Perhaps I wanted to be loved like that. This time around I barely noticed her. I deeply understood and was encouraged by the place Anodos had to come to in order to lose his shadow, his self. I long to get to that place where my shadow, my self, taps me on the shoulder and I brush her away without a thought.

What care I for her? I finished this book up as I sat in the emergency room with my husband. I was completely sheathed in my self as I hunkered there trying not to notice the horribleness of the humanity around me. Yes, it seemed horrible to me. Those sick, sick people. I wanted to just be me sitting somewhere safe and warm drinking coffee and eating cookies, watching the hummingbirds and listening to Bach.

True, good, beautiful ME. But George MacDonald stripped that bare and showed me what the ugliness of my own vision for my own self. I had thought I had made progress in the brushing her aside but there she was in the emergency room hunkered down trying to ignore the back of the tapestry-the place Christ always is. The place where humanity roils and smells and writhes. Christ was there even when I was trying not to be.

Forgive me, Father.

Phantastes A Faerie Romance for Men and Women by George MacDonald #Audiobook

Forgive me for underestimating the sinfulness of my own self. View all 17 comments. Maggie Wonderful review, thank you. Jul 21, PM. Sam Giddy Thanks for this beautiful review Cindy! Oct 05, PM. Not like a quest, with a destination and obstacles along the way. View all 7 comments. I like a good faerie story, a nice romp in fairy lands. I especially like reading older fantasy novels to help this graph I have in my head showing the progression and evolution of fantasy in literature.

MacDonald's book here, published in , seemed like a good one to pick up - it's an early fantasy novel with an introduction by C. Lewis, possibly the world's first MacDonald fanboy and OMG he drooled all over MacDonald in that introduction , and this MacDonald guy inspired not only Lewis, I like a good faerie story, a nice romp in fairy lands.

I often suck at reading allegories. When I read Narnia the first time? I was all, "Oh, hey, Aslan the lion is super cute. I went into reading this knowing a bit about MacDonald and that he wrote these allegorical type things. I was a little hesitant, but open to the idea - so many of these writers like Lewis write fantastical allegories and somehow in my head I'm trying to make sense of it all because that's just not how my brain works, I'm too scientific or something.

I think there are religious stories and then there are fantasy novels, and I don't always get how they can be one and the same without likely getting into an argument with someone. So it's better to just keep my mouth shut. Okay, so the story is fine, but man, it really dragged for me. I don't feel it ever really picked up, and maybe that's because I knew that I was being for lack of a better word tricked by MacDonald. I knew that what he was writing was not what he was saying and that made me sort of irate.

So I tried to put that aside and just focus on the imagery because MacDonald wrote incredible imagery. But that trickery was beneath it and I couldn't get over it.

Phantastes - Wikipedia

Plus, there are a lot of songs. Remember Tom Bombadil's songs in Tolkien? Whatever, this just didn't work for me. It's not without merit, though, and clearly a lot of writers I do appreciate, respect, or even enjoy were into MacDonald. I have more of his books that I will eventually read, but I'm not particularly looking forward to it. Let's put it this way - this book wasn't worth the overdue library fees I accrued by holding onto it longer than I should have.

It's just You can put cheese on broccoli but it's still broccoli, y'know? View all 12 comments. On his twenty-first birthday, Anodos entered his father's study and opens a drawer where a little woman that claims to be his grandmother grants his wish to go to fairy-land. With many tests to pass, will he pass them all to make it into Fairy-land or is all just a fantasy? Read on and find out for yourself. This was a pretty good read and my first ever read by George Macdonald. It was full of action, adventure, prose and was a very whimsical fantasy.

Look for this book at your local library and On his twenty-first birthday, Anodos entered his father's study and opens a drawer where a little woman that claims to be his grandmother grants his wish to go to fairy-land. Look for this book at your local library and wherever books are sold. I know that I read this once before, many moons ago.

But my only recollection of it consisted in the fact that I had read it. I recently decided to read it again because of the impact it had on Lewis. Having done so, I can only conclude that Lewis saw a great deal more in it than I was able to, although I did enjoy it -- particularly the last third. There are some great moments. But it struck me as kind of a fairy land hodge podge, only with the hodge parts and the podge parts packed closely tog I know that I read this once before, many moons ago. But it struck me as kind of a fairy land hodge podge, only with the hodge parts and the podge parts packed closely together by hand.

View 2 comments. In many ways this really isn't a good book. The style borders on choppy and dense. The story doesn't always flow. MacDonald routinely makes excurses without telling you. The "mythopoeic" prose is its redeeming quality. MaDonald bathed the book in sacramentality.

Phantastes

Every leaf, grove, and spring refleted redemption--and MacDonald is a talented enough artist that he can show redemption without telling you redemption usually. The story line is simple enough. The protagonists finds himself in " In many ways this really isn't a good book. The protagonists finds himself in "faerie land" and must navigate through trials and temptations, with all the self-discoveries.

CS Lewis mentioned this book spoke of a "good death. This is none other than the Christian story of Baptism, a Baptism that our hero must undergo. Final thoughts: Sometimes the beauty was so intoxicating that I felt my heart would stop. May 07, Werner rated it liked it Recommends it for: Fantasy fans who don't mind Victorian diction. Shelves: fantasy. While I read this book several years ago the date is a "best guess" , I'd actually started it back in and didn't finish it at that time. It gets off to kind of a slow start, and one element in the storyline was initially off-putting to me but no spoilers here!

However, I'm glad I decided to give it a second and fairer chance; it proved to be a solid three-star fantasy that I enjoyed. Basically, it's a coming-of-age tale in a fantasy setting; and it's perhaps the first example in th While I read this book several years ago the date is a "best guess" , I'd actually started it back in and didn't finish it at that time. Knowing that MacDonald was a favorite author of C. Lewis, it isn't hard to see the influence of this work on the idea behind the latter's Narnia series.

There are actually no explicit Christian references in the book, but the author's Christian worldview underlies the strongly moral tone and messages here. Of course, this is a 19th-century work, with Victorian diction throughout; readers who find that problematic will probably enjoy the book less than those of us who don't mind that!

A friend and I decided to have "family story time" each evening as a new bedtime routine to help us fall asleep more calmly in the midst of interpersonal and academic stress. We chose this classic tale, picked up by C. Lewis at a train station he later said that it influenced his writing greatly.. We have at least a dozen notecards with quotes from the book scattered about the A friend and I decided to have "family story time" each evening as a new bedtime routine to help us fall asleep more calmly in the midst of interpersonal and academic stress.

We have at least a dozen notecards with quotes from the book scattered about the room now. View 1 comment. The book relates the story of Anodos, a young wealthy man who, on his 21st birthday receives the keys to a mysterious secretary which belonged to his father. He opens it and so begins his journey into adulthood.

It is really the story of his coming of age through challenges he has to overcome, of joy and love and sadness and despair, for he must go through all of that. His journey takes him to a fantastic land — he meets a birch-tree that is not really a tree, statues that are not really statues, giants and knights and kind old ladies. Learn that sometimes we do harm and are forgiven by those whom we have hurt, that love can be of many ways, that beauty does not equal purity of soul, and friendship has wonderful rewards.

Each adventure is meant to teach him something and he comes out of this experience changed, an adult. Imbued with wonderful bits of poetry and very vividly described scenes, it took me to another world where everything was possible and nothing was left to chance, to a land where beauty goes hand in hand with ugliness and where weeping is the companion of laughter. In other words, life. Mar 19, Alex rated it really liked it Recommends it for: fantasy geeks. Shelves: reading-through-history , , rth-lifetime. This is a neat little book.

It's a bit episodic, and a little flowery, but it's really vivid; there's some terrific imagery in here.